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chilean juice

Spring Fresco juices

Fresco Juices

Ever bake a cake from a box and it came out delicious? Did you know you could do the same with winemaking?

Mondiale Fresco is proud to be the only product to offer home winemakers their own vineyard in one unique package. Each pail of juice is pre-balanced and adjusted to ensure you have the best winemaking success possible. Just warm up the juice to fermentation temperature and watch it go.

What does “pre-balanced” and “adjusted” mean?

Every season Mother Nature gives us a different wine grape harvest. Some years the acid, pH, and sugars are all in line with each other. Most times they aren’t and there needs to be some slight adjustments made pre-fermentation to ensure top wine quality. The Fresco juices are adjusted so that the acid, pH, and sugar levels are all in balance with each other. This makes for an easier fermentation and, a very pleasing wine.

Depending on the varietal of wine you choose, enzymes and tannins might be added – all pre-measured, and ready-to-go, just open the packet and add to the pail. These add-ons help with wine clarity and mouthfeel, contributing to the “taste like made from scratch”, or in this case, as if fermented on the skins. The Fresco juices are the best juices to work with for busy winemakers. You get the juice warmed up, watch it ferment, age, and bottle.

No muss, no fuss. Just delicious wine.

 

What varieties are available from Chile?

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Cabernet Sauvignon:

This Chilean Cabernet Sauvignon offers a beautiful deep ruby colored robe with a predominant bouquet of blackberry and raspberry accompanied by a hint of pepper. Its slightly aggressive attack and long finish on the palate grant this wine the potential for a longer aging period.

Body: Full

Aroma: Fruity, Spicy

Origin: Chile

Winemaker addition: Light Oak

Alcohol: 13.2%

Carmenere:

This variety is considered as the flagship red wine of Chile. This crimson red wine has big character along with soft tannins and spicy undertones all at once. The mouth filling flavors are enhanced by the ever present oak.

Body: Full

Aroma: Fruity, Spicy

Origin: Chile

Winemaker addition: Dark Oak

Alcohol:  13.2%

Chardonnay:

Our golden straw-colored Chardonnay displays a tropical fruit bouquet complete with vanilla undertones. On the palate you’ll find notes of passion fruit and citrus – a well-balanced wine easily enjoyed during a meal or by a cozy warm fireplace.

Body: Full

Aroma: Fruity, Woody

Origin: Chile

Winemaker addition: Light Oak

Alcohol: 13.2%

Chardonnay Semillon

This wonderful blend brings together two halves of a whole into a harmonic union. The Semillon contributes flavors of honey and butterscotch to the Chardonnay’s nuances of tropical fruits and vanilla. A true symphony of flavors.

Body: Full

Aroma: Caramelized, Fruity, Woody

Origin: Chile

Winemaker addition: Dark Oak, Light Oak

Alcohol: 12.6%

Malbec:

Mosti Mondiale’s Chilean Malbec is an unforgettable journey through Chile’s wine country. A beautiful garnet robe, dark red cherry flavors and a nose comprising of cigar tobacco and coffee all combine for a delectable experience.

Body: Full

Aroma: Fruity, Herbaceous, Woody

Origin: Chile

Winemaker addition: Dark Oak

Alcohol: 12.9%

Merlot:

Our Chilean Merlot’s deep burgundy color, violet undertone and almost overwhelming bouquet of ripe red cherries and spices make it a true contender in the Chilean red wines category.

Body: Full

Aroma: Fruity, Spicy

Origin: Chile

Winemaker addition: Dark Oak

Alcohol: 12.9%

Sauvignon Blanc:

Light amber color with a strong citrusy bouquet and herbal undertones. Crisp and clean on the palate, can be enjoyed on its own or with light dishes or appetizers.

Body: Medium Full

Aroma: Fruity, Herbaceous

Origin: Chile

Winemaker addition: Light Oak

Alcohol: 12.4%

Viognier:

A medium-bodied white wine with aromas of freshly picked green apples and apricots that displays a stunningly long and floral aromatic finish. Take a sip of Chile!

Body: Medium Full

Aroma: Floral, Fruity

Origin: Chile

Winemaker addition: Dark Oak, Light Oak

Alcohol: 13%

What varieties are available from South Africa?

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Cabernet Sauvignon

In the world of wines, the Cabernet Sauvignon is one that does not get neglected – and with good reason! The intense mouthfeel coupled with fruity notes of cassis, plums and cherries make this wine an unequivocal master of provoking the senses. Dry, full-bodied and slightly woody arising from the natural overabundance of tannins. If you are courageous enough to set this South African Cabernet Sauvignon aside for 12+ months, it will give new meaning to the phrase “ages like fine wine”!

Body: Full

Aroma: Fruity, Woody

Origin: South Africa

Alcohol: 13.2%

Pinotage

A South African line-up is not complete without a Pinotage. This bold red wine is synonymous with South Africa and it’s no wonder why – its hints of dark and red fruits combine to produce a medley consisting of blackberries, raspberries and licorice on the palate. More subtle flavors include rooibos, tea leaf and flavorful pipe tobacco. The bouquet exudes hints of wood and spices. Relatively high acidity provides a strong finish, making it the perfect pairing for game meats, gourmet burgers and homemade pizza.

Body: Full

Aroma: Fruity, Herbaceous, Spicy, Woody

Origin: South Africa

Alcohol: 13.5%

Sauvignon Blanc

You would be hard-pressed to find a more refreshing wine than a young, crispy South African Sauvignon Blanc. This splendid white wine is made to be enjoyed quite young. The combination of greenish, vegetal and mineral flavors emanating a few weeks after fermentation will make it very difficult to put this one away for a while. Off-dry with a lively acidity and medium finish. Serve slightly cool with light seafood platters.

Body: Medium

Aroma: Herbaceous, Woody

Origin: South Africa

Alcohol: 12.4%

Shiraz

Experience one of South Africa’s most renowned grapes: a dry, full-bodied cherry-red Shiraz with fruity, spicy notes when young. As it ages, subtler flavors like coffee, chocolate begin to take over. The nose slowly develops a hint of charcoal, which adds to the mysteriousness of this classic wine. Enjoy it with company if you really want to share it, but don’t be ashamed of keeping it your own little secret!

Body: Full

Aroma: Caramelized, Fruity, Spicy, Woody

Origin: South Africa

Alcohol: 13.2%

What varieties are available from Australia?

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Cabernet Sauvignon 

Full bodied deep garnet red. This wine offers up flavors of blackcurrant, blackberries with a slight hint of cedar. The tannin structure of the Cabernet Sauvignon matched with French Oak, create a wonderful symphony of tannins.

Body: Full

Aroma: Fruity, Woody

Alcohol: 13%

Chardonnay

This Australian Chardonnay offers up a complex fruity bouquet, with hints of ripe stone fruit and an underlying citrus note. On the palate it is well balanced with just the right amount of oak enhancing its full bodied flavor.

Body: Full

Aroma: Fruity, Woody

Winemaker addition: Light Oak

Alcohol: 13%

Merlot

Soft and mellow texture right from the start. This Merlot offers hints of cassis with light floral notes.

Body: Medium

Aroma: Floral, Fruity

Winemaker addition: Dark Oak

Alcohol: 12.5%

Orange Muscat

This white wine has citrus and honey notes with a slight sweet finish. On the palate it is fresh and crisp with a lingering clementine flavor.

Body: Light

Aroma: Caramelized, Fruity

Winemaker addition: Sweetener

Alcohol:12%

Petit Verdot

Bold and full bodied, the Australian Petit Verdot offers up flavors of dark fruits; black cherry, plums, with firm tannins and hints of spice.

Body: Full

Aroma: Fruity, Spicy

Winemaker addition: Dark Oak, Light Oak

Alcohol:13.5%

How do I make my own?

Musto Wine Grape Company is here to help you make the wine of your dreams! The Spring winemaking season starts in late April, early May. Secure your winemaking grapes or juices and give us a call at (877) 812-1137 to speak with one of our Musto Crush Crew members. We can get you set up with everything you need and provide customer support along the way to ensure your success!

Bud Break in Chile

While we were busy crushing and pressing in the fall, our Chilean vineyards were going through bud break.

Bud break is the start of the grape vine’s annual cycle. Bud break is a relaxing time in the vine’s life as long as they don’t experience any intense weather occurrences, such as frost.  Frost can kill the buds or delay their growth.

This season Chile had a some cold weather come through the vineyards. Thankfully our vineyards were able to keep the vines protected and did not have any frost damage. Take a look at the bud break in our Chilean vineyards and get a sneak peak at the harvest ahead.

Bud Break in Chile – October 2019

Grapes Available: Chardonnay, Pinot Grigio, Sauvignon Blanc, Viognier, Cabernet Sauvignon, Carmenere, Cabernet Franc, Malbec, Merlot, Petite Verdot, Pinot Noir, and Syrah

Juices Available: Carmenere, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet/Merlot Blend, Malbec, Merlot, Petite Verdot, Pinot Noir, Syrah, Chardonnay, Pinot Grigio, Sauvignon Blanc, and Viognier

Fresco Juices Available: Cabernet Sauvignon, Carmenere, Merlot, Malbec, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Viognier, Chardonnay/Semillon Blend

For more information on making wine, please visit our website at www.juicegrape.com and our Facebook Page for real time harvest updates. Our Chilean wine grapes arrive in late-April and early-May. If you are interested in making an order please email sales@juicegrape.com or give us a call at 877-812-1137 to discuss this season’s harvest.

2018 Chilean Harvest Update

This year’s growing season should produce some intense and complex wines!

We are very excited and fortunate to be sourcing our Chilean grapes and juices from the “Heart of the Chilean Wine Industry” known as the Curico Valley.  Curico has been a wine grape growing region since the 1800s. With its fertile soil, microclimates, and the ability to grow over 30 different wine grape varieties, it’s no wonder this prestigious region is considered the heart of the wine industry.

Soil Content: Sand, clay, decomposed granite, and volcanic-alluvial.

The second region we will be sourcing from is the Colchagua Valley. The Colchagua Valley is known for growing bold red wines, such as Carménère, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, and Syrah. It has a mediterranean climate and is located along the southern end of the Rapel Valley. This topography creates a climate that receives around 23.3 inches of rainfall per year and little to no rainfall during their summer months. This helps keep the grapes safe close to harvest and ensures that the grapes are fighting for water therefore creating a more intense fruit.

 Soil Content: Sand, decomposed granite, and clay

This year’s harvest has gotten off to a great start. The white grapes are coming off the vine and will be in transit soon. Our early red grapes such as Pinot Noir and Merlot will start harvesting around March 30th.

Arrival Dates: White grapes should arrive around the last week in April and the red grapes should start to arrive around the first week in May. Get your crushers ready!

Grapes Still Available: Carmenere, Chardonnay, Pinot Grigio, Sauvignon Blanc, and Viognier

Sold Out: Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Malbec, Merlot, Petite Verdot, Pinot Noir, and Syrah

Juices Available: Carmenere, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet/Merlot Blend, Malbec, Merlot, Petite Verdot, Pinot Noir, Syrah, Chardonnay, Pinot Grigio, Sauvignon Blanc, and Viognier

Fresco Juices Available: Cabernet Sauvignon, Carmenere, Merlot, Malbec, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Viognier, Chardonnay/Semillon Blend

Yeast suggestions for the following grapes via Manuela Astaburuaga

Yeast suggestions for the following grapes via Manuela Astaburuaga. Manuela is the enologist at “Correa Albano” and has studied in both France and New Zealand. Her family also owns many of the vineyards we source from.

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  • Sauvignon Blanc – For the SB the most important thing is the yeast that express the thiols aromas. Try VIN13 to bring out such thiol aromas like tropical fruits.
  • Carmenere & Merlot – Try a yeast that expresses the black fruits like CSM
  • Cabernet Sauvignon –You want the fruit and earthiness to shine. Try D254, BM4X4, or CSM. Maybe think about blending yeasts for more complexity!
  • Pinot noir – RC 212 is one of the best yeasts for Pinot Noir.

Manuela’s Favorite Blend:  Merlot-Carmenere

Why does Sauvignon Blanc wine taste so good from Chile? (According to Manuela)

  • “The different temperature between day and night is very important to the aroma expression, we have that kind of climate in our Valley (Curicó) so our SB is very aromatic and with a good acidity. We ferment at 58-50ºF to preserve the aromas.”

Want to take a Walk through our Chilean Vineyards?

Red Grapes Hanging

Take a walk through our Chilean Vineyards by clicking the link below.

http://bit.ly/2CgQkNi

Harvest will be here before you know it. White Grapes will start arriving in late April and Red Grapes will start arriving in Early May. See below for the list of grapes and juices we will have available this Spring.

Grapes From Chile:

Carmenere
Cabernet Sauvignon
Cabernet Franc
Malbec
Merlot
Petite Verdot,
Pinot Noir
Syrah,
Chardonnay
Pinot Grigio
Sauvignon Blanc
Viognier

Fresh Juices from Chile:

Carmenere
Cabernet Sauvignon
Cabernet Franc
Cabernet/Merlot Blend
Malbec
Merlot
Petite Verdot
Pinot Noir
Syrah
Chardonnay
Pinot Grigio
Sauvignon Blanc
Viognier

Fresco Juices from Chile:

Cabernet Sauvignon
Carmenere
Merlot
Malbec
Chardonnay
Sauvignon Blanc
Viognier
Chardonnay/Semillon Blend

Give us a call at 877.812.1137 for more details about the Spring Harvest. Or email us at sales@juicegrape.com

Verasion in Chile, or as the Chileans call it, “Enverno”

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The Chilean harvest is starting soon. Verasion, or as the Chileans call it, “Enverno,” began in some wine grape varieties around January 25th and most of the grapes are currently around 15 Brix. We should be seeing white grapes start to arrive around the last week in April, and red grapes start to arrive around the second or third week in May. We will be sourcing grapes from Curcio and Colchagua valleys this year.
The Curico Valley, known as the “Heart of the Chilean wine industry,” and will produce some intense grapes this year. One of the steps that were put into place when cultivating this year’s crop was the pruning the vines later in order to delay the plants from maturing. Our growers started pruning Chardonnay around October 1st and Cabernet Sauvignon around September 20th. This was done to help reduce the risks associated with seasonal frosts and this tactic definitely paid off as the grapes look excellent.  The Colchagua Valley is known for hearty red wines, such as Carménère, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, and Syrah. It is located 100 miles south of Santiago, and is an ideal growing region for bold grapes. A little cooler than Curico Valley, but it still remains a Mediterranean climate. A great place for growing intense wine grapes that make complex and palate pleasing wines.
The crop this year looks to be of normal tonnage, but with a tighter marketplace developing around Chilean wines, grapes are tighter than previous years. Additionally, the growing season was a bit cooler than normal and harvest is expected to be about 10 days behind last year. This year’s growing season should produce some intense and complex wines.

Winemaker Spotlight Interview with Manuela Astaburuaga

Christina, Sebastian, Patrick, Manuella in vineyard

Winemaker Spotlight Interview with Manuela Astaburuaga

How did you get started winemaking? 

I’m the 5th generation viticulturist in my family so I was born between tanks and vineyards. When we were kids we played hide and seek in the tanks of the winery and we rode a bicycle among the vineyards.

When I finished the school, I decided to study Agriculture because I love the nature and live in the countryside, then in my last year of university I went to Australia to do my first vintage and I loved it. After I started to work with my family and I decided to go to France to do a Master in viticulture and Oenology.

What I love the most about Oenology is that most of the time there is a family tradition behind it. In my case my father founded the company Viña Correa Albano in 1991 but my grandfather, great grandfather, … also had their own winery Viña Astaburuaga.

Who were your wine mentors? 

My mentors where my father and grandfather. My grandfather was one of the first to broker of wine in Chile and one of the first to export wines. We also have photos of the first exportation where you can see the boats with tanks full of wines.

I really don’t pay attention to the winemakers. I love to taste different wines from different wineries, valleys and countries, but I never pay attention who was the winemaker, for me is a team job.

What do you look for when you make wine? What is your general winemaking philosophy?

The most important thing is have good quality grapes. A healthy grape, free of disease, means we can start making a good wine.

In white wines the expression of aromas and acidity is really important, so we try to have long fermentations at low temperature.

In reds, the wine aging is the most important for me. It is necessary to have the micro oxygenation to soften the tannins and it is very important to limit the oxidation to preserve the fruity aromas that come from the grape.

What is the most difficult aspect of making wine? What’s your biggest challenge as a winemaker?

The first thing is to have good quality grapes, for that we have to work all year.

In viticulture/oenology we say that we never have two equal years so for me the biggest challenge is to know how to react quickly in different situations as a rain or excessive heat for example can cause challenges.

What bottles of wine in your cellar are you most excited about? 

A few weeks ago, we were sorting out and we found samples of our first exportation of wine. We opened a bottle and it was really good so now that we found the bottles we take care of them the most. Also, I have a box of 12 bottles of my grandfather’s wine from my year of birth that he gave to my parents at my baptism and I’m waiting for a special occasion to open it.

I don’t have any favorite wines but for me the history behind the wine is very important, we cannot compare a big Chateau of Bordeaux with unlimited means with a small producer with all the adversities of nature.

In general, I enjoy more a wine from a small producer with a tradition behind them, than a wine from a big winery.

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What’s your philosophy on Oak and Wine?

For me the most important is oxygen in aging the wine, the barrels have porosity so they give a micro-oxygenation to the wine which is very important to the complexity and the maturation of tannins.

I use barrels, but I always try to not exaggerate because I prefer to preserve the fruity aromas over those gave from the oak.

Are you filtering your wines?

Yes and no. We have a tangential filter which is very good in preserving the quality. For our premium line, which has a minimum of 8 months in the barrel we will not filter.

Are there any new winemaking techniques or tools you’d like to experiment with?

We are thinking about implementing the pulsair system in our winery, so we don’t have to us the remontage method and limit the oxidation.

What’s been your greatest challenge as a winemaker?

The generational change.

Any advice for a new home winemaker? 

Have patience. We cannot rush the aging and to have complexity, sucrosity and soft tannins are important and take time.

Also, you have to have in mind that the oxygen can be the best friend or the worst enemy in the aging. Is important to have micro-oxygenation to help the maturity of wine but if it is not controlled, he can oxidize some components and be harmful to the final quality.

If you had to pick one wine to drink for the rest of your life what would it be?

I cannot pick only one wine, for me the wine depends the occasion and is important to change and try different wines.

What’s your favorite wine region?

I don’t have a favorite region but I loved the whites of Alsace and the Cabernet Franc of Saumur Champigny.

What would people be surprised to know about you?

I am shy and I have a very bad memory, that’s why I can never remember the names of the winemakers and wineries I have tasted (that’s why I always write my tasting notes).

If you weren’t making wine what would you be doing?

I really have no idea!